Thetraillesstraveledby



Ask me anything  
Reblogged from alwaysmoneyinthebnanastand
Is it political if I tell you that if we burn coal, you’re going to warm the atmosphere? Or is that a statement of fact that you’ve made political? It’s a scientific statement. The fact that there are elements of society that have made it political, that’s a whole other thing. Neil deGrasse Tyson (via socio-logic)

(Source: alwaysmoneyinthebnanastand, via wilwheaton)

Reblogged from gynocraticgrrl

monkeyelbow:

gynocraticgrrl:

Sunitha Krishnan has dedicated her life to rescuing women and children from sex slavery, a multimillion-dollar global market. In this courageous talk, she tells three powerful stories, as well as her own, and calls for a more humane approach to helping these young victims rebuild their lives.

Sunitha Krishnan is galvanizing India’s battle against sexual slavery by uniting government, corporations and NGOs to end human trafficking.

Sunitha Krishnan: The fight against sex slavery

Great woman. Please read it.

(via thepoliticalfreakshow)

Reblogged from thepoliticalfreakshow
Reblogged from wilwheaton
A study, to appear in the Fall 2014 issue of the academic journal Perspectives on Politics, finds that the U.S. is no democracy, but instead an oligarchy, meaning profoundly corrupt, so that the answer to the study’s opening question, “Who governs? Who really rules?” in this country, is:
 
“Despite the seemingly strong empirical support in previous studies for theories of majoritarian democracy, our analyses suggest that majorities of the American public actually have little influence over the policies our government adopts. Americans do enjoy many features central to democratic governance, such as regular elections, freedom of speech and association, and a widespread (if still contested) franchise. But, …” and then they go on to say, it’s not true, and that, “America’s claims to being a democratic society are seriously threatened” by the findings in this, the first-ever comprehensive scientific study of the subject, which shows that there is instead “the nearly total failure of ‘median voter’ and other Majoritarian Electoral Democracy theories [of America]. When the preferences of economic elites and the stands of organized interest groups are controlled for, the preferences of the average American appear to have only a minuscule, near-zero, statistically non-significant impact upon public policy.”
 
To put it short: The United States is no democracy, but actually an oligarchy.

US Is an Oligarchy Not a Democracy, says Scientific Study | Common Dreams

If we had a truly independent and adversarial press in my country, this would be a big news story, but they still haven’t found that plane, so … whaddayagonnado right?

(via wilwheaton)

(via wilwheaton)

Reblogged from misandry-mermaid

"I don’t have a problem with gay people I just don’t want them throwing it in my face"

touchabletimmy:

ezekielofgod:

boner-chan:

misandry-mermaid:

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Uh…… you mean like this?

wow. let it be known that tumblr legitimately changed my opinion on something today.

I’m sorry but is there an advert about toilet paper in there. They are legitimately trying to sex up toilet paper.

Damn?

(via thepoliticalfreakshow)

Reblogged from thepoliticalfreakshow
Reblogged from azspot
Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire, which the HBO series is based on, fully develops the individual agency of characters. He creates incredibly complex plots with characters that have flaws and make decisions that are half-chance. Readers have been shocked at how characters can be killed off with little notice, but they describe his writing as having “realness” and “humanity.” Anything can happen to any character at any time, but in a realistic way. If Tolkien followed the trajectory of agency-based writing, it arrives with Martin’s truly complete world of agents. Each personality is multi-layered, acting on their history and experience, changing as the story does. Tolkien clearly favored a central character with the narrative weaving around them; however, his stories give an air of a much wider world that the main character simply exists within. Going further, Martin writes characters with such realistic motivations, reflecting the complexity we see in others and ourselves, that it is a significant shift in storytelling. This paradigm change is of course not simply relegated to fantasy writers, but the popularity of the two writers underscores this transformation. Agency. Or Why We Love Game of Thrones and Lord of the Rings. (via azspot)

(via azspot)

Reblogged from truthdogg
We’re a violent people. Sometimes I try to convince myself that we aren’t, and that we are no more predisposed to kill, to seek vengeance, to attack or invade, to use lethal force than others, but it isn’t true. It clearly isn’t true. Centuries of genocide and slavery leave a lasting effect. A few generations are no match for that deep imprint. We can honor the good, or try to, but the powerful still write our history and set our culture. But these are the people I love and the culture I know. All I can do keep my voice steady, keep doing the best I can, keep working to win over hearts and minds, keep trying to end the fear and the deranged justifications that accompany it. truthdogg:   (via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

Reblogged from azspot
At the state level, however, Republican governors and legislators are still in a position to block the act’s expansion of Medicaid, denying health care to millions of vulnerable Americans. And they have seized that opportunity with gusto: Most Republican-controlled states, totaling half the nation, have rejected Medicaid expansion. And it shows. The number of uninsured Americans is dropping much faster in states accepting Medicaid expansion than in states rejecting it. What’s amazing about this wave of rejection is that it appears to be motivated by pure spite. The federal government is prepared to pay for Medicaid expansion, so it would cost the states nothing, and would, in fact, provide an inflow of dollars. Health Care Nightmares (via azspot)

(via azspot)

Reblogged from justinspoliticalcorner